An Inspiring Story Of an Armless Man Who Works As Engineer For Hendricks Motorsports, NASCAR’s Most Winning Organization.


Richie Parker, 31, was born with bilateral amelia, a non-genetic birth defect in which limbs aren’t formed and grew up. Many have doubted that Richie will have a normal life due to his condition but Richie work his way through to prove them wrong.

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Today, Richie can ride a bicycle, open the door on his own, use a computer and drive his own car, on the top of that, he is a vehicle engineer for Hendricks Motorsports, one of the most winning organizations of NASCAR.

“Based on his resume, I knew he could do the things that I needed him to do, it was more a question of how,” Rex Stump, engineering manager at Hendrick motorsport, said during his interview on ESPN.

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If performing the job as engineer without arms is unthinkable for Rex Stump, For Richie it is not a problem at all. Richie managed to use his feet to build custom high-performance automotive parts by placing the keyboard and mouse on the floor.

Richie’s can-do attitude made him accomplish different tasks- from opening refrigerator door to creating a system for him to be able to drive his car.

During his interview on ESPN, Richie said that he isn’t sure where he got his drive to achieve, but probably you’ll get a hint after hearing his parent’s side of the Richie’s story.

In May 1983 when Richie Parker was born in Beaufort, S.C., Richie’s father, Tracy, said he was surprised for all of five minutes when doctors said that their son had been born with a non-genetic birth defect called bilateral amelia that left him without arms.

But that was before he saw his son.

“He was the cutest baby,” said Richie’s father. “He was the cutest little boy.”

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After hearing the news, Richie’s mother never waste a time focusing on what her son was missing, either.

“I’m thinking, how we gonna get through this? How would he eat? How would he open doors. How would he do just the normal day-to-day things? But when I saw Richie, there was no question after that,” said Lottie.

“We wanted his childhood to be as close to any other child’s childhood as possible. That’s always been our attitude. We are going to make it work. We might do it differently but it will work,” she added.

http://youtu.be/qiLDMBDPCEY

video credits: ESPN via Youtube.com / Tom Rinaldi for the report / credits to the rightful owner of this video & photos

An Inspiring Story Of an Armless Man Who Works As Engineer For Hendricks Motorsports, NASCAR’s Most Winning Organization.

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